May 112015
 

(Blogmensgo, gay blog of 11 May 2015) In a judgment of 29 April 2015, the Court of Justice of the European Union validates the ban by France gays from donating blood, suggesting that France will show a more flexible attitude towards them.

A blood red justice. © Court of Justice of the European Union.

A blood red justice. © Court of Justice of the European Union.

More than nine months after hearing the parties, the European Court has delivered a judgment that attempts to run with the hare and cabbage.

The decision taken in this case C-528/13 (summary available in EN | ES | DE | IT |UK ) stated initially that “permanent exclusion from blood donation for men who have sex with men can be, given the situation in the Member State concerned, justified “. But as soon as it is stated “effective detection techniques [HIV] or less restrictive methods to ensure a high level of protection of the recipients of health are lacking” in France.

The European Directive of 22 March 2004 permanently banned blood donation by “people whose sexual behavior puts them at high risk of acquiring severe infectious diseases transmitted by blood.” The judgment of 29 April asking the Strasbourg administrative court to ensure that the alleged risk of contamination is strong enough not to fall on the European principle of non-discrimination based on sexual orientation.

Epidemiological data provided by France in that case relate only to the period 2003-2008. In addition, the court considers in its judgment, permanent exclusion from blood donation against gays seems to be disproportionate to the risks (“the principle of proportionality may not be respected”).

The Strasbourg administrative court must therefore ensure that firstly , there is no “effective techniques” that can better protect recipients, and secondly , there is no “less restrictive methods which the permanent exclusion “against gays.

And the Court of Justice of the European Union to suggest that it is better “to identify more precisely the risky sexual behavior” that stigmatize groups of people solely because of their sexual orientation.

The decision is not final, since it refers the parties to the French court, so the Strasbourg court.

Meanwhile, April 3, 2015, the National Assembly unanimously adopted an amendment saying that “no one can be excluded from donating blood because of his sexual orientation.” The French Health Minister, Marisol Touraine, then confirmed that health prior questionnaires would soon focus on sexual risk behavior and not on the sexual orientation of potential donors.

This article has been translated from our French blog, to view the original, click here.

Philca & Matt / MensGo
(via the entire French press of 29 April 2015)

To share, bookmark, send or print this text (click for extra choices)
Apr 292015
 
(Blogmensgo, gay blog April 29, 2015) April 27, next to the Supreme Court of the United States shortly before the start of hearings on gay marriage. The least positive decision, it is hoped, will cause a rainbow tidal wave.
Below, a brief Reuters report in its uncommented live.

This article has been translated from our French blog, to view the original, click here.
Philca & Matt / MensGo
To share, bookmark, send or print this text (click for extra choices)
Apr 292015
 

Blogmensgo, gay blog of 29 April 2015) This year’s Gay Pride has put Tokyo’s Shibuya neighborhood at a buzz on 26 April 2015. This year, the Tokyo Rainbow Pride was more openly protest by demanding equal rights for all couples to marriage.

Below, a brief report of Euronews video in no comment section:

http://www.euronews.com/nocomment/2015/04/27/gay-pride-parade-in-tokyo-japan/

The Japanese Constitution prohibits gay marriage, but it does not prohibit LGBT activists to march to get it. There was actually some 3,000 people, beating the pavement of Shibuya, one of the trendiest and shopping districts of Tokyo (and to think I missed it by two weeks, but at least got to see the cherry blossom).

Gay Pride in Shibuya was without tanks or total interruption of traffic, unlike the LGBT parades in Berlin, São Paulo and Paris. In Tokyo, participants, however, were generously provided with t-shirts, banners, banners, signs, logos and slogans of a rainbow sky. The futuristic type of cosplay clothes were also part of the party, according to Euronews.

The wedding open request to all Japanese couples was part of this year in the very specific context of gay civil unions established by the Borough Hall in Shibuya. Although it does not take effect until July 2015, constitutes a marriage at a discount and only concerns the only district of Shibuya, the future “certificate of union” could serve as a real booster to the cause of LGBT the Japanese archipelago.

Another novelty of the 2015 edition is that for the first time the Tokyo Rainbow Pride takes place over two days and thus not limited to its traditional parade through the streets of the capital. The day of April 25 has even sounded the start of a Rainbow Week, a week full – until May 6 – of cultural events and workshops, sports, health, recreational or festive.

Indeed, the general public seemed to be more responsive to LGBT claims than in previous editions.

Companies have also taken an active part in the parade, either by introducing an official delegation, either by staking the golf friendly wickets. American Gap, Goldman Sachs and Google each held a stop teaching them. Employees of large Japanese companies, like Nomura Holdings and Dentsu, carried banners with the logo of their company in proclaiming their commitment to equality and LGBT diversity.

According to figures released April 23, 2015 by the advertising agency Dentsu from an online survey, the LGBT community now represents 7.6% of the population, against 2.4% according to a similar study 2012.

This article has been translated from our French blog, to view the original, click here.

Philca & Matt / MensGo
(via all the press on 26 April 2015, including Libération and Japan Times )

To share, bookmark, send or print this text (click for extra choices)